4:00pm | Michael Eric Dyson | Main Street Church

320 N Main St, Chelsea, MI 48118

Michael Eric Dyson is an acclaimed author of nearly 20 books, including his latest work, the New York Times bestseller, Tears We Cannot Stop, a non-fiction work that examines racial divide and calls for change. He is the recipient of two NAACP Image Awards for Outstanding Literary Work in Non-Fiction, and winner of the American Book Award for his work Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster. Dyson has also written for the New York Times and is a contributing editor for the New Republic and ESPN’s The Undefeated website. In addition to his work as an author, Dyson is a Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University and a former radio show host of the Michael Eric Dyson Show.

Dyson received his PhD from Princeton University and has taught at taught at Brown, Columbia, the University of North Carolina, DePaul University and the University of Pennsylvania. Dyson has been lauded for his hard-hitting books and other advocacy for African Americans. Essence declared him one of 40 most inspiring African Americans, and he was named among the 100 most influential black Americans by the website Ebony.

Praise for Tears We Cannot Stop

“Elegantly written and powerful in several areas: moving personal recollections; profound cultural analysis; and guidance for moral redemption. A work to relish.” Toni Morrison

“Here’s a sermon that’s as fierce as it is lucid…If you’re black, you’ll feel a spark of recognition in every paragraph. If you’re white, Dyson tells you what you need to know―what this white man needed to know, at least. This is a major achievement. I read it and said amen.” Stephen King

“This work is both lucid in its logic and profound in its probing and wide-ranging cultural and social analysis. Dyson’s homily resonates amid personal recollection and reflection as a call to action for Americans to reach a positive future by working to cultivate empathy, develop racial literacy, and live up to the demands of justice.” Library Journal

“One of the most frank and searing discussions of race I have ever read.” Patrick Phillips,  New York Times Book Review

2018-04-13T11:15:34+00:00